Accessible Travel: Lonely Planet’s inaugural hangout

Accessible Travel

 

Accessible Travel Hangout

Accessible Travel Hangout

Accessible travel is a discussion on the whole that has made progress on a global scale across the board. The task that lies ahead is for greater accessible travel for all and the development of a stronger working network between every aspect of the tourism industry.

Lonely Planet claims that half of people with disabilities would travel much more if they could find suitable facilities. In answer to this Lonely Planet brought about the ‘Travel For All’ initiative to help improve the options and services available. This is not a disability rights nor social inclusion issue but the need for greater opportunities within the tourism industry. It has been suggested the legislative battle has been won and it is now time to push forward to provide a greater service on a mass scale.

Every service in the industry must work together but the first movement must come from National Tourism Boards. National tourism boards can make accessible travel easier for the industry with simple changes than can be made at low cost which will no doubt boost revenue. The EU has recently made funding available to improve services for people with disabilities. Catalunya in Spain offers a wide selection of services and options that has been directly supported by their national tourism board.

Every disability is different – there is no one size fits all. There is a minimal selection of offerings of accessible travel and within Britain where there is a more general approach. Accommodation and travel are the frequent products and services provided, only the tourism industry must look to provide every option for every disability and look to push the boundaries of travel options. The tourism industry as a whole has adapted greatly throughout history to the needs and demands of the consumer so the need to adjust again for better accessible travel cannot be considered a challenge.

Once the industry has adapted to the needs of their consumers the question is posed about how to reach the client. With new technology and social media bringing the world closer there must be a willingness and a conscious effort form the disabled community to help one another. The positive change of accessible travel is ongoing and one that just needs the right drive of people to move it forward.

 

[Tweet “Accessible Travel: Lonely Planet’s inaugural hangout @lonelyplanet @Martin_Heng @SeableHolidays”]

 

3 thoughts on “Accessible Travel: Lonely Planet’s inaugural hangout

  1. Just thought I would bring to your attention a world wide web site constructed by people with disabilities. It is: http://www.australiaforall.com and is entirely devoted to accommodation and leisure venues which are accessible to people with disabilities in 54 countries. There is no charge for tourism providers to be part of this web site as long as they cater for people with disabilities as well as those without any disability.. The whole idea of this web site is that it ihas been constructed as a community service obligation with the underlying concept that tourism providers who make the effort to ensure that their facilities are accessible to people with disabilities, should not have to pay to advertise the fact.

  2. Pingback: Accessible Travel: Lonely Planet's inaugural ha...

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